Archive for vendor relations

Donuts and Business

saturnMy 2002 Saturn’s starting to show its age. First the AC died…then the battery went…or was it the alternator?

Either way, my bride’s been after me to replace the old girl, but I like her. With only 129,000 miles, this vehicle should be good for years to come. Plus she’s already paid for.

Still, things sometimes need to be replaced. So while the wizards at Poway’s 5-Star Automotive patched up my car this morning I munched on donuts, read magazines, and chatted with other customers.

Good thing, because I discovered someone who recognized she needed marketing to grow her business. And she understands that quality services cost money.

We talked about her desires for growth, audience, and what makes anyone want to buy from her.

Which transformed a 2-hour car repair visit into a sales call. A contract should follow behind shortly.

Woo Hoo!

I’ve met people who refuse to attend networking events because they cost money or take away from personal time.

These same people complain their business isn’t growing as much as they want it to.

However, since selling is a numbers game, talking to more people automatically improves your chances of making a sale.

That’s why you’ll find me trolling chamber of commerce events, filling in for friends at BNI, and visiting a wide range of organizational meetings.

I figure the more people I talk with, the more people I’ll meet with marketing needs.

From there it’s just a matter of persuading those prospects I walk on water and the deal is done.

Now, realistically, you can’t do business with everyone. But the opportunity I had this morning didn’t take me out of my way or cost me anything.

Just by my being open to listening to someone else’s needs, I was able to show her a potential solution. She saw I actively listened to what she was saying and decided I could probably help with her problems.

And so a sale was born.

Regardless of what you sell, you’re constantly surrounded by people who might buy from you. The trick is helping them self-select as potential customers.

If they sense you’re only interested in selling to them you’ll turn them off. But if they believe you’re interested in providing answers you’ll close the deal.