Archive for Public relations

You’re calling it WHAT?

Driving through CoPerformanceUtilitySupply_Underground-Utilities-Home1rona I spotted a roadside sign reading PUS.

Having a twisted sense of humor, I wondered who would want to buy the stuff.

The sign was attached to a company named Performance Utility Supply. They sell hardware to the power and lighting industries.

I’m guessing most of their customers are “manly” men in construction. Their website photo of an unshaven guy wearing his PUS gear reinforces my suspicion.

The company also has a sexually suggestive line emblazoned on their trucks. And if this strategy works for them, who am I to argue?

Still, one has to wonder about the long-term wisdom of this type of gender-based marketing. While today women only make up 9% of construction workers, change is inevitable.

Over the past 50 years, women have achieved parity in one industry after another. In the current political climate, their numbers can only be expected to increase.

All suggesting the eventuality of more women buyers in one of the last bastions of male domination: construction.

It’s no surprise that women oftentimes view the world differently than men. Historically, professional women are less likely to engage in sophomoric hijinks than their male counterparts.

Which all points to women buyers in construction and related trades who will want to be taken seriously and/or be offended by the PUS name and marketing strategy.

Naming a business can be tricky, easily going down the wrong path. Things to consider when you’re naming your business include:

  • How will your audience receive it?
  • How will your acronym read?
  • Is the name exciting, or a compromise reached to satisfy a committee?
  • Does the name say something, or is it just feeding someone’s ego?
  • Are you just mashing words together in hopes of being clever?
  • Do you stand out of the crowd in a good way?
  • Are you merely naming the business after the town you live in?
  • Are you using clichés or obscure words?
  • Is your spelling funky?
  • Can you get a domain to match your company name?
  • Are you budgeting enough to brand your name to customers?
  • Can you admit if the company name is just wrong?

Company names should bring value to the table. The last thing you want is for customers to be offended when they see your business’ name.

Delivering Savings Until Closing Time Today

A man walks into the post office…WONDERUSPS2

Sounds like the beginning of a bad joke, doesn’t it?

But there I was waiting to buy postage and I discovered a coupon jointly issued by Hallmark and the U.S. Postal Service.

In truth I shouldn’t have been surprised. For the past few years the Postal Service has been getting increasingly commercial in an effort to overcome an annual $5 billion deficit. And because the USPS is a quasi-governmental agency receiving zero tax dollars, that money obviously has to come from someplace.

So, a few years back they started selling ancillary items like packing supplies and greeting cards.

Then they struck deals to feature animated characters on postage stamps, including Bambi, Big Bird and Daffy Duck.

Today, stamps featuring Wonder Woman can be affixed to Snoopy greeting cards, both purchased at the postal counter.

The tie-in between postage stamps and Hallmark greeting cards is a logical one.

Post offices have a built-in customer traffic flow. Most cards get mailed and need stamps.

What better place to tie the stamps, card, and customers together than there?

Furthermore, free email graphics have been the source of headaches for Hallmark executives for a long time.

If they can sell more cards and pay the USPS a sales commission, everyone wins, right?

Their plan is obvious;

  • Customer chooses a card from the multiple displays in the postal store lobby;
  • Coupon offers $1 off 3 cards if purchased before Feb. 17, 2017 (That’s TODAY, in case you hadn’t noticed!);
  • Customer buys two additional cards and stamps for mailing them

The promotion’s demise date screams “Valentine’s Day,” though any cards sold there qualify for the discount.

Now let’s examine your business. Odds are good there’s a potential partner for you, regardless of what you sell.

Car dealerships can join forces with area gas stations. Bakeries can work with exercise studios, which, in turn, can partner with beverage companies.

The USPS isn’t collecting buyers’ contact information, but there’s no reason you can’t. A list of buyers is incredibly valuable, since:

  • They like what you and your partner sell
  • You have an established relationship
  • They’re likely to buy from you again

Partnerships must be carefully thought out and planned, but can be very successful if done right. Learn from the USPS and develop one today.

Right this way, Mr. Squinty

In September I found myself at a branch of my bank awaiting a receipt. My sd-sdreyer-1485458125-snap-phototime was spent perusing brochures, people-watching, and staring into space. Then the monitor behind the counter caught my eye.

As a marketing professional I’m naturally curious about every company’s messaging. So I watched their video presentation. Twice.

Finally I realized the problem. “The picture’s fuzzy,” I told the teller, who smiled noncommittally.

Last week I visited another branch of the same bank and determined the problem wasn’t my eyes, but the presentation itself.

This time the teller acknowledged the issue. “We said something to headquarters weeks ago and they promised they’d fix it,” she said.

Yet here we are, months later, and the problem persists.

When I started in business, my father advised me to be sensitive to customers’ needs. “People’s eyes start playing tricks on them around age 40,” he warned.

Truer words were never spoken! Shortly after I hit 40 my eyes started acting up, and they’ve only gotten worse with age.

So here I was observing a marketing presentation that was unfocused and giving me a headache.

And the bank’s marketing department apparently wasn’t very concerned about it.

Meaning the message meant to reinforce my warm fuzzy feelings for this bank instead irritated me.

Counter-productive? You bet!

Even if the bank eventually gets its act together, it’ll be quite a while before I’m watching that video again.

Translation: beyond the annoyance factor, they’ve lost a very visible, very cost-effective tool for communicating with me.

And a measure of good will has also been lost because they didn’t pay attention to my needs.

Now let’s consider your business. Do you:

• Know your customer’s profile and their preferred ways of being communicated with?

• Understand their needs to ensure they receive your message?

• Listen to your staff when they tell you there’s a marketing issue requiring attention?

Admittedly I’m not so annoyed that I’m moving my business elsewhere…yet.

Still, I’m now wondering which other concerns of mine they’re ignoring.

And should the competition hit me with the right offer, benefits, and messaging on the right day, I might be persuaded to switch.

All because some faceless person didn’t take the time to ensure quality control at the point of sale.

Selling with a smile

Successful salespeople looking to immediately develop customer rapport know smiling-thumbs-upthe importance of a smile.

A smile is a universal indicator of openness, friendliness, relaxation, and likeability. It’s a powerful asset for salespeople looking to build long-term client relationships.

Consider a job interview I once screwed up.

It was about 20 years ago in Boston, and I was perfect for the position. We went through the interview process and I met six or seven people with whom I’d be working. Everything was lining up in my favor.

After the meeting I wandered over to Quincy Market for lunch. Lost in thought, I didn’t pay much attention to the fellow in the suit giving me the once-over.

Not recognizing him as an executive who’d wandered through the meeting I just completed, I gave him a sour look.

It all went south from there, and I never heard from them again.

In hindsight, looking pleasant, or at least neutral, would have undoubtedly been more profitable. Live and learn, right?

Smiling’s value can’t be underestimated. It can easily make the difference between whether or not you walk out with a signed contract in your pocket.

Ask yourself if you smile:

  1. While talking about your company
  2. On phone calls when the other person can’t see you
  3. During public speaking engagements
  4. During video-conference calls
  5. In your professional headshot

People will quickly spot fake smiles, so sincerity’s important for a smile to be an effective tool.

Okay, it’s true that many sales professionals have a naturally upbeat personality, smiling frequently throughout the day and during interactions with customers and prospects.

Interestingly, this simple act also happens to be one of the most effective ways to cut through adverse situations, conflicts, and disappointment. If you’ve just been told no or a deal has fallen through, a smile is your first defense against negativity.

Indeed, many studies show that smiling attracts people because it projects positivity.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow astutely observed; “Into each life some rain must fall,” but a smile is the best defense. Even if you’re talking with people who don’t have time or money or don’t want to listen to you, smile anyway. It keeps you in control of your life, your emotions, and your selling process.

A Vision For Tomorrow

trump-clinton-1-620x412In September, 2001, my family and I were buying a house north of Boston. Then 9/11 hit, scrambling everyone’s plans.

Our initial reaction was to stop the transaction and hide until things settled down. But with a $15,000 deposit at risk, we saw little choice but to proceed with the purchase.

Having consummated the deal, everything eventually sorted itself out. We picked up our lives and made a future we were happy with, including moving to RB a year later.

Flip forward to Mr. Trump’s stunning upset in the presidential election. Millions of voters unhappily watched the nation choose its new leader.

In quick succession I heard people I respect talk seriously about fleeing the country or halting major new initiatives.

Panic of the unknown and riots in the streets ensued. This was combined with wild gyrations in financial markets and comparisons to an American Brexit from sanity.

If you’re one of these people, remember how much you have invested in your lives, communities, and businesses. You can’t just go blindly running off into the night, screaming.

Because whether or not you’re pleased with the presidential election results, we all must deal with this new reality.

Furthermore, because of America’s reach and impact on virtually everything worldwide, there’s really no place to hide as the next four years unfold.

Want the silver lining? It’s nine weeks until the new administration is seated. This provides you adequate time to revisit your marketing plan to reflect the prospect of a Trump administration.

Reconsider your media choices, sales offerings, and audiences. If you truly believe your business will soon go downhill, plan to invest more in your marketing to counter that potential scenario.

And what if you got the election results you wanted? You’d best quickly move beyond gloating and singing “Dong Dong, The Witch Is Dead,” lest you offend customers who don’t see the world the same way you do.

Bottom line: The election’s done. It’s time to focus once again on growing our businesses. The distraction caused by candidates sucking all the oxygen from the room with every utterance is rapidly being replaced with the minutiae associated with actually governing.

As for me, I’m just grateful that Indecision 2016 is behind us, and look forward to a better tomorrow.

About that Walking Billboard…

jack-o-smashMoving to California in 2002, I immediately heard about the region’s famous “green flash” at sunset.

Over the past 14 years I’ve seen it exactly never, though I remain ever hopeful.

To compensate I drink lots of Green Flash beer. The only green I see through my bloodshot eyes is the stuff leaving my wallet to pay the barkeep.

So it was with a certain amount of relief that I saw a green flash at Tuesday morning’s Rotary meeting in Rancho Bernardo.

What I initially thought to be a hallucination, though, turned out to be whirlwind Realtor Sue Herndon. Her screaming green T-shirt was touting this Sunday’s Jack-O-Smash fundraiser at Poway’s SportsPlex.

As she talked about the fun times ahead and the charities being supported, I took a moment to notice the dozens of company logos represented on her shirt.

Their support of the PoVa therapeutic riding program, the Abraxas High School Transitions Program and PUSD’s special education foundation told me these are good corporate citizens, deserving of my respect and patronage.

Which, by one of those strange coincidences of life, was EXACTLY what they wanted me to take away from the experience.

Okay, I confess … when I put on a T-shirt I don’t necessarily think much about whose name or logo is on it.

Yet I recognize that my wearing that shirt has two implications. First there’s the obvious marketing message.

But there’s a second layer that subliminally ties my reputation to the organization and sponsors represented on the shirt.

In effect, my wearing that T-shirt is an endorsement of everything said on it.

Whoa! When did getting dressed become so complicated?

Here’s the thing: there are dozens of organizations worthy of your business’ support within a stone’s throw of where you’re sitting right now.

Beyond finding a cause you believe in to contribute to, you’ll also benefit by finding one where your contribution buys you space on their T-shirts.

For a few dollars you may be able to arrange to have hundreds of people using their own credibility, reputation, and network to market for you.

As you develop your 2017 marketing plan, set some money aside to help the community while helping yourself.

Admittedly this isn’t a fancy or high-tech communications strategy. But people DO pay attention to these things, and it can be effective.

Hey…Where’d You Go?

column-movedSometimes my dog gets lonely. He’s 12 and set in his ways.

This is challenging on days when I’m out for the entire day.

Enter doggy daycare (yes, there is such a thing), where he spends his time with a pack of 80 furry knuckleheads.

He’s happy and safe there, meaning I can tend to business.

So imagine my surprise when I drove up last week to find the daycare facility had vanished. A crew was overhauling the building for a new tenant. A small sign directed me to a location two miles away where the daycare providers had moved to.

The new location was buried at the far end of a long parking lot. Though I eventually found it, my unanticipated detour forced a 15-minute delay for a client meeting.

The facility no doubt updated their Facebook page with their new address…only I rarely visit that page.

So how was I to know they’d moved? And how difficult would it have been for the daycare staff to send me an email with this news?

A bizarre concept, right? You’re changing location and tell people where to find you so they can continue doing business with you.

Failing to tell anyone (with the possible exception of those on-site the week of the move) guarantees these guys will lose business.

At some point that new tenant will move into the old location and the signage pointing to the new daycare facility will disappear.

When that happens, anyone visiting the old location will probably assume the daycare facility is defunct and find a new service provider.

Every business has a house list of current, past, and prospective customers. Over 30 years I’ve learned the most profitable organizations regularly communicate with everyone on that list.

Communications (newsletters, promotions, emails, texts, calls, postcards, etc.) should vary by audience.

Because whether you’re sharing buying opportunities, factoids, stories, or case histories, customers must be reminded why they need to have you in their lives.

Recognizing that out of sight is out of mind, regular customer outreach ensures customers think of you often and remember to buy from you.

Regular customer contact will grow your business over time, as well as helping you to weather disruptions like moving the business to a new location.

Speak up, Sonny!

This morning I got my dog’s hair cut.

Buddy Weinberg desperately needed a haircut!

Buddy Weinberg desperately needed a haircut!

From across the parking lot a friend saw my hat and shouted “It’s impossible to miss you!”

It’s the power of marketing…finding ways to stand out of the crowd.

Regular readers know that the average American adult is bombarded with 5,000 marketing messages every 24 hours.

As consumers we erect virtual walls around ourselves to block out the onslaught. Marketers are tasked with finding ways to break through those walls.

Simple equation, right?

Still, what do you do with someone who doesn’t want to talk about themselves?

Consider my client Suzy. She’s brilliant, talented, and extremely photogenic. She knows her business inside and out, and has contributed hugely to her employer and her industry.

So I naturally nominated her for the Business Journal’s WOMEN WHO MEAN BUSINESS award…and she protested.

“I haven’t done enough,” she cried.

Now I protested. Because if I waited until she felt she’s done enough to warrant an award, Suzy and I will both be VERY old.

In these days of political bombast, when commercials are shouting at us from every direction that this one is great and that one can solve your problems, there’s more reason than ever to build those walls around ourselves.

And on one level it’s refreshing to find people who are humble. They put their heads down and work, never seeing the promotional opportunities from their productivity, talent or physical beauty.

They’re blessed with the “Aw Shucks” gene.

Yet surviving New York City’s rough-and-tumble taught me that being shy doesn’t equal good marketing. You need to stand up and shout who you are and why it’s important to pay attention to you.

And if you’re not comfortable doing so, you need to find a guy with a megaphone and a big mouth.

Yes, someone like me.

Because failure to promote yourself in your professional community means you’ll disappear from view.

You’ll find promotional opportunities all around you. They easily include speaking at conferences, posting columns to an ever-expanding LinkedIn universe, and schmoozing at Chamber of Commerce events.

Then relax. Even if you don’t win any awards, merely staying visible will introduce you to new friends and sales prospects.

And since so much success is based on whom you know…

Getcher Free Puppy Here!!

puppy_love_theme-201597-1230259247Millions of US pets need adopting. Regardless of the breed or age you’re seeking, petfinder.com has it.

That’s where we discovered Buddy, a sweet terrier/bichon mix found walking the streets. Given the inexpensive preponderance of man’s best friend available at this web site, I never understood why one would spend thousands at a pet shop.

Still, my family and I would regularly visit the Escondido Mall pet shop to sigh over the dogs from Midwestern puppy mills. Then we’d go home with new appreciation for the furball patiently awaiting us.

When that pet shop closed, I suggested the Humane Society open a storefront there to give away animals needing adoption. Economics and logistics prevented the idea’s implementation, but the universe apparently welcomed it.

Today a shop called Escondido Pets sits at the same site. While the majority of their inventory is expensive, the front dozen slots are dogs available for adoption.

For around $100 a family can walk out with the sweetest faces and personalities in town. These are dogs that have lived in unpleasant situations who’ll never forget the value of a loving home.

The store manager advised me they’ve placed about 100 dogs since the first of this year.

By no coincidence, the dogs being adopted also need leashes, collars, cages, dog bowls, snacks, and toys. All are available there for immediate purchase.

Which means unloved animals are getting homes and the store is increasing market share while doing something admirable. Even if their other dogs are from puppy mills, Escondido Pets deserves kudos for helping unwanted pooches get adopted.

Regardless of what you sell in your own business, somewhere there’s a worthy cause that’ll benefit from your involvement and participation.

Try collecting spare change at your cash register for the March of Dimes. Or contributing goods and services to a silent auction at your church.

Regardless of how you get involved, customers will quickly link your name with the wider good you’re doing. They’ll also think of you first when they’re looking to do business in your category.

Helping those most in need is worthwhile year-round. Even if it cuts into the bottom line short-term, it’s potentially profitable over the long-run.

Because let’s face it: giving is good for the soul.

Got Original Ideas?

got-milkThis morning I drove past a truck that said “Got Tinting?” promoting a car window service.

Then there was a car saying “Got Cloud?” for computer storage.

In the afternoon I saw a shirt reading “Got Mary?” touting a church.

Tonight I saw “Got Debt?” campaign ads.

My question: Got Original Ideas?

These messages all reference a 1993 TV ad for California’s Milk Processor Board.

In it, a hapless history buff eating a peanut butter sandwich is called in a radio station contest to identify who killed Alexander Hamilton in a duel.

He correctly answers “Aaron Burr,” but the peanut butter sticking to the roof of his mouth muffles his response.

Desperately he grabs a bottle of milk, only to find it empty. Our friend loses the prize as the commercial’s tag line appears: Got Milk?

And from that moment the phrase “Got Milk?” became part of the popular culture.

The ad is generally considered one of the best commercials of all time. It is even parodied in the Broadway musical Hamilton.

Here’s the thing; I recognize that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Churches, computer firms, and others are obviously trying to leverage the Milk Board’s success into their own.

Regardless of what you’re selling, though, people expect you to address their concerns.

But if the best message you can deliver is a blatant rip-off of someone else’s ad campaign, that doesn’t say much about your ability to provide original solutions.

In fact, if you’re incapable of generating original ideas and the next guy can, shouldn’t I just hire him instead?

Because even if his ideas aren’t a home run, at least he’s making the effort. Just saying “Got Shoes?” or “Got Chocolate?” tells me you’re just phoning it in.

Please don’t misunderstand. You should be watching other marketing materials looking for ideas. Someone may have a great concept for photography, typography, or copy and you can use it as research.

But research and outright theft are completely different. Research Good. Theft Bad.

Get it?

So the next time you think it’s clever to just say “Got Whatever?”, think again. You’re NOT being clever…you’re being a “Me Too!”. And you’re fooling nobody but yourself.

One might even argue your marketing efforts are being counter-productive.